130 Homework

Homework:

The value of working problems in chemistry cannot be overemphasized!  The only way to develop a mastery of chemistry is though persistent efforts at understanding and applying the material we introduce in the classroom.  A proven approach to developing mastery is through working practice problems.  It is not unusual for a chemistry student to spend 2 hours studying and working problems outside of class for every hour of class time.

We will be using the Sapling online system for much of our graded homework because it provides useful, immediate feedback on problem to help you improve your problem-solving abilities on the fly.  More details on Sapling will be presented in class.

The end of each chapter in your text also presents a host of problems.  These are broken down into “Exercises”, “Integrative and Advanced Exercises”, “Feature Problems” and “Self-Assessment Exercises”.   Listed in the table below are some Integrative and Advanced Exercises that I feel are fairly representative of exam or quiz problems.  For those exercises, I have included more extensive solutions.  A cull solutions guide is available in the Chemistry Contact Center.

Ideally, you should be able to complete each of the “Exercises” in less than 5 minutes, without looking in your text for explanations.  The “Integrative and Advanced Exercises”, and “Feature Problems” often incorporate multiple concepts and will take somewhat longer to work (~10 minutes).

If you get stuck on a problem, note it as one to ask about or return to, and then go to the next one (this is also a good test-taking strategy!). If you get through a problem, but do not get the correct answer, first look to see if it is a simple math error or something similar. If it is, then you probably have a reasonable grasp of the material, you just need to be careful about the details. If you can’t find your mistake, don’t spend more than five minutes looking for it; ask a study partner about, see me in office hours or stop by C3 to ask another faculty member.

Forming a study group can be a great way to learn, provided it functions correctly.  A study group does not work if only one person is actually working through the material, while the others spend most of their time nodding and smiling and saying “that makes sense”.  A study group should be relatively small (3-4 people) and be a support system to aid in the struggle through challenging material.  As you move through a topic or a problem, ask yourself the question: “Could I explain this correctly to someone else?”  if the answer to the question is yes, you probably have a handle on the material, if not, discuss the material with a partner and hash things out until you get a better understanding.

Selected Integrative and Advanced Exercises.

Chapter Problems Solutions
1 69, 71, 73, 74, 77, 81, 82, 87, 88, 89 Chapter 1 problems
 2 69, 72, 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 84, 86, 87 Chapter 2 problems
3 83, 84, 88, 91, 94, 96, 98, 103, 105, 106 Chapter 3 problems
4 60, 76, 79, 94, 96, 97, 102, 103, 107, 113, 119, 123  Chapter 4 problems
5 70, 72, 76, 77, 81, 86, 87, 90, 92, 91  Chapter 5 problems
6 54, 65, 72, 95, 96, 98, 107, 108, 113, 119 Chapter 6 problems
7 26, 32, 38, 44, 69, 74, 84, 93, 100, 107 Chapter 7 Problems
19-1 to 19-5 7, 17, 22, 24, 28, 31, 72, 75 Chapter 19 Problems
14 12, 16, 18, 24, 27, 31, 38, 49, 54, 59, 70, 83 Chapter 14 Problems
15 8, 12, 19, 26, 30, 33, 43, 44, 58, 59, 65, 75, 86 Chapter 15 Problems